References and URLs for Daniel Greenstein’s presentation to the Stanford-California State Library Institute on 21st Century Librarianship, “Digital Libraries and their Challenges”

 

D Greenstein

10 August 2000

 

1.       Developing sustainable, scaleable collections

 

1.1.    Collection policies and guidelines relevant to:

 

1.1.1.       Commercial electronic resources (see Anne Okerson, Electronic Collections Development page at http://www.library.yale.edu/~okerson/ecd.html )

 

1.1.2.       digitally reformatted collections (see Selecting Research Collections for Digitization by Dan Hazen, Jeffrey Horrell, Jan Merrill-Oldham, 1998, available from CLIR at http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub74.html. Also see another CLIR publication by Abby Smith, Why Digitize)

 

1.1.3.       pointers to third-party Internet resources (see links from IMESH at http://www.desire.org/html/subjectgateways/community/imesh/ and the collection policies developed by the subject gateways of the UK’s Resource Discovery Network at http://www.rdn.ac.uk/)

 

1.1.4.       For links to numerous electronic collection development policies and strategy documents also see DLF’s Documenting the Digital Library. A registry of policies, technical documents, and etc., at http://www.clir.org/diglib/pubs/techreps.htm

 

1.2.    Distinguishing characteristics of digitally reformatted collections. The examples characteristics are taken from Ann Marie Parsons, “Accessing the Invisible Digital Collection: A Library School Student's Perspective”, DLF Newsletter, 1:1(2000) at  http://www.clir.org/diglib/pubs/news01/features.htm

 

1.2.1.       rich yet bounded narrative (see the Blake Archive and other collections from the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities. The Blake Archive is at http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/blake/main.html)

 

1.2.2.       context (wee the New York Public Library’s, Maps, Atlases, Charts, and Globes from the Lawrence H. Slaughter Collection http://www.nypl.org/research/chss/epo/mapexhib/navigate.html)

 

1.2.3.       comprehensible front matter (see the exhibition hall at the National Archives and Records Administration http://www.nara.gov/exhall/exhibits.html)

 

1.2.4.       integrating disparate collections (see The Tebtunis Papyri Collection and the Advanced Papyrological Information System project at The Bancroft Library at http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/APIS/index.html)

 

1.2.5.       quality resolution (The David Rumsey Collection at http://www.davidrumsey.com/)

 

1.3.    Integrating access to distributed information resources via:

 

1.3.1.       union catalogues (see the the OPAC of the Consortium of University Research Libraries – COPAC – at http://www.copac.ac.uk/ )

 

1.3.2.       distributed search services (e.g. of the Arts and Humanities Data Service at http://ahds.ac.uk:8080/ahds_live/)

 

1.3.3.       metadata indices (see the Searchlight service at California Digital Library http://searchlight.cdlib.org/cgi-bin/searchlight)

 

1.4.    Keeping an eye on strategy and business models (see the Academic Image Cooperative’s Collection Strategy and Development Framework at http://www.clir.org/diglib/collections/aic/aicrev.htm)

 

2.       Standards and practices

 

2.1.    Documenting practice

2.1.1.       by assembling information (see Documenting the Digital Library, a registry of policies, technical documents, and etc., at http://www.clir.org/diglib/pubs/techreps.htm)

 

2.1.2.       through review (see Preserving Access to Digital Information – PADI – at http://www.nla.gov.au/padi/)

 

2.2.    Evaluating practice and defining digital library preferences

 

2.2.1.       for data creation (see TEI Text Encoding in Libraries Draft Guidelines for Best Encoding Practices, Version 1.0 at http://www.indiana.edu/~letrs/tei/)

 

2.2.2.       for data production (see RLG/DLF Guides to Quality in Visual Resource Imaging at http://www.rlg.org/visguides/)

 

2.2.3.       and with a view of fitness for purpose (see AHDS Guides to Good Practice from http://ahds.ac.uk/public/guides.html)

 

3.       Digital preservation

 

3.1.    Raising awareness:

 

3.1.1.       About the problem (see Preserving Digital Information, Report of the Task Force on Archiving of Digital Information by Donald Waters and John Garrett, from http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub63.html)

 

 

3.1.2.       its dimensions see (eLib supporting studies on preservation conducted by the British Library Research and Innovation Commission at http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/services/elib/papers/supporting/)

 

3.1.3.       and possible solutions (see work of the CEDARS program at http://www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/ and publications of CLIR and the DLF listed at http://www.clir.org/diglib/preserve.htm)

 

3.2.    Sharing information (see PADI, op cit)

 

3.3.    Developing preservation frameworks (see the Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System at http://ssdoo.gsfc.nasa.gov/nost/isoas/overview.html) and strategies (see A Strategic Policy Framework for Creating and Preserving Digital Collections at http://ahds.ac.uk/manage/manintro.html and decision tools See Preservation Management of Digital Materials Workbook, by Maggie Jones and Neil Beagrie (forthcoming from http://www.ahds.ac.uk/)

 

3.4.    Gaining practice archiving

 

3.4.1.       the web (see the Internet Archive at http://www.archive.org/)

 

3.4.2.       research data (e.g. at the AHDS – http://www.ahds.ac.uk/ or the Inter University Consortium for Political and Social Research - http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/index.html

 

3.4.3.       and electronic records (e.g. at the National Archives and Records Administration)

 

4.       Architecting the digital library

 

4.1.    see Kerry Blinco, “Modelling Hybrid Information Environments: The Librarian and the Super Model”, from http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/dlis/models/models9/presentations/kb-m9.ppt

Back to Top|Previous Page|Print